Moving to YYC: How to buy ASAP

Moving to Calgary and Buying a Homes As Soon As Possible

This is a common question, and as usual, the way the banks / lenders want things done is exactly the opposite of what works in real life, for real people, like you.

You Want: To buy a home in Calgary, move the family in, get settled and then start the new job – RIGHT! That makes the most sense.

The Lenders want:

  • You to have 1 full-cycle payslip BEFORE then will fund your mortgage and
  • You to be completed the 90 day probation if you have a probationary clause in your new employment

Why?

PAYSLIP: The first full-cycle pay-slip – meaning 2 full weeks of pay – critically needs to match your employment letter / job offer at 40.00 hours; or whatever it is that you are guaranteed for pay. If it does not match, then your income is not guaranteed, and the lenders want to see guaranteed pay.

39.97 hours is not 40.00 hours; it means the 40 hours is not guaranteed and the lenders often decline to fund your mortgage.

PROBATION: In Alberta, you can be let go for no reason in the first 90 days of employment – even if you are NOT on probation. It does not matter if there is/not a reason, it is the law.

Obviously, if you just moved here, bought a home and are let go, the odds of you moving back are high. And the bank is left in the risky position of losing money on the home or making an early CMHC claim. Which is why they want to see either: NO probation, or a shortened & completed probation period, or a completed probation period.

Work-Arounds:

  • Workaround 1: We recommend and often see new employees specifically asking for no or short probation periods. You are taking the risk moving here, the employer is often willing to waive the probation – which can be the key to speeding a home purchase.
  • Workaround 2: Depending on how your math works out, you may be able to carry 2 mortgages at 1 time. There are 2nd Home Programs that can work for situations like this, but again, the math is different for everyone.

How to make the move as smooth as possible

The smoothest way to buy a home when relocating is to start the job first. Ask for the employer to waive or shorten the probation period. Then rent, stay with friends, or anything that works for the first 2 or 3 weeks. Then when you have a full-cycle pay slip you can buy a home that works for you and take possession as soon as possible is a much smoother transaction. Otherwise you are “trying to push a rope up a hill” and the bank’s don’t like that at all.

We see issues with people buying too soon all the time. Forcing the system often backfires on new home owners. The resulting brain damage is not worth trying to do the transaction backwards in the eyes of the banks.

Mark Herman; top Calgary Alberta Mortgage Broker, with best rates

Why today’s bank rate cut is not a big deal for mortgages

Below is a great summary of why this rate cut is not a big deal mortgage wise.

All the banks kept their rates the same but for TD that lowered their Prime rate by 0.10% only. No other banks have followed yet and are not expected to. As you can see the banks will keep that rate cut to boost their profits … because they love money; specifically, your money, not you.

Variables went down only by 0.1% … and fixed rates all stayed the same … at their 115 year all-time lows. Looks like mortgage interest rates are as low as they can go.

Mark Herman, top Calgary Alberta mortgage broker for home purchases and mortgage renewals.

Why the Bank of Canada’s interest rate cut won’t help us.

The Bank of Canada decision Wednesday to cut its key lending rate for the second time this year to 0.50 per cent …

The impetus behind the cut wasn’t really about getting you to borrow more or ease your borrowing burden. It was about widening the gap between our interest rates and those in the U.S. to push our dollar down.

“Canada’s economy is undergoing a significant and complex adjustment,” the bank said in its rate decision, noting there was a modest recession in the first half of the year as the economy contracted.

Our dollar started the day down a third of a cent to 78 cents, a level not seen in 10 years. That’s going to make snowbirds unhappy, but the central bank is more interested in fuelling exports to our larger trading partner.

Can the Bank of Canada really save the day? Rates are already so low, we’re at the point of diminishing returns. Each new cut is greater in percentage terms than the last, but the real impact is smaller and smaller.

Here are four reasons this cut isn’t likely to make much difference:

1. Not much relief

If interest rates are at 15 per cent – not far off what I was paying for my first mortgage – and fall to 10 per cent, that’s a 33 per cent decline and puts a huge amount of money in your pocket.

If the rate is 0.75 per cent and falls to 0.50, it’s the same 33 per cent drop, but the saving is negligible. By the time it filters down through the banking system to your line of credit, the difference may add up to a Big Mac meal.

Wednesday’s move by the central bank means the banks will likely lower consumer borrowing costs a little. The betting is that they’ll give us 10 basis points and they’ll keep the other 15. TD Bank was first off the mark, doing just that.

So, suppose you’re a good bank customer. Your $100,000 secured line of credit is at prime, plus half a point, or 3.35 per cent (2.85 plus .50). You’re making an interest-only payment each month which comes to $279 a month.

The bank passes on 10 basis points. Your new combined rate is 3.25 per cent, or $271 a month. Spend that $8 wisely.

2. Indifferent businesses

Businesses who need money to invest are already borrowing. This rate cut won’t make a difference to their plans…

3. Indifferent consumers

…  many consumers see the low rates as normal. He’s right, in that anybody 45 or younger has only lived in an environment of falling interest rates. So 10 basis points off is just more of the same and unlikely to generate much interest….

4. Drooping dollar

Economist have noted that the January rate cut did send the dollar lower, but did little to accelerate growth, even as the loonie fell from 87 cents to about 82 cents and now 78 cents..

http://www.thestar.com/business/personal_finance/2015/07/15/4-reasons-the-bank-of-canadas-interest-rate-cut-wont-help-us-mayers.html

Graph shows why mortgage rates may go up soon

We watch all kinds of indicators for when mortgage rates may change.

This is the main one, the CMB – Canadian Mortgage Bond. As you can see it is on the way up and mortgage rates and the graph are directly related.

Rate Watch Program
When rates go up the banks call us and give us at least 2 hours – and sometimes 2 days – notice. This lets us send in all the files that we are working on for 120 day – or 4 month – rate holds. All the files that have enough data in them – at least an application and the disclosures and a payslip – get rate holds at today’s rates.

The banks do not do this for you! Another reason to use a broker that works the system to your advantage at no cost to you!

04MAY15_30dayCMBonly

Mark Herman, top Calgary Alberta mortgage broker for new home purchases and mortgage renewals.

Alberta sky is not falling

The graph below shows the expected Alberta GDP growth rate for the end of 2015 and 2016. The numbers are still positive – just not as high as they were before.

If the Calgary to Edmonton corridor was a country it would have the 2nd highest growth rate in the world after China.

Now these numbers are back to earth, things will continue as normal as oil slowly works it’s way back to about $70 a barrel.

Mark Herman, Top Calgary, Alberta mortgage broker

Click on the chart to see it larger.

image

Calgary housing market a low overall risk of price delines

All the hot air about Calgary housing being over-valued looks to be hot air as CMHC’s report notes below.

Mark Herman, top Calgary Alberta Mortgage broker for renewals and new home purchases

Calgary housing market a low overall risk: CMHC

Slight mortgage rate increase on the way?

We watch lots of technial things to see where rates are going. One of those is the CMB – Canadain Mortgage Bond.

Today, the benchmark government of Canada five year bond yield ended the week at 0.79%, up from 0.73% the previous week.

that means that fixed rates may move up from their 2.74 – 2.79% soon.

Get your rate hold / applicastion in!

Mark Herman, AMP, B. Comm., CAM, MBA-Finance

WINNER: #1 Franchise for Funded $ Mortgage Volume at Mortgage Alliance Canada, 2013 and 2014!

Direct: 403-681-4376

Accredited Mortgage Professional | Mortgage Alliance | Mortgages are Marvelous

Toll Free Secure E-Fax: 1-866-823-1279 | E-mail: mark.herman@shaw.ca |Web: https://www.markherman.ca/

More bad news about collateral loans

More collateral info in the press. As we have been saying for more than a year now; collateral loans can trap you later. Leverage the expertise of a person who has dealt with mortgages all day for more than 10 years when deciding what is best for you.

Short version of the article below: it is going to cost you about $2,500 to get out of a mortgage with a collateral charge when the term is done. That is not a “payout penalty” but the cost to re-register your mortgage later at a different bank when they try to renew you at a higher rate at the end of your term.

Mark Herman, top Calgary Alberta Mortgage Broker for Renewals

Search "collateral" in this blog search bar to see the other articles on this topic.

A collateral mortgage can trap you: Roseman

You may want to change lenders at the end of a mortgage term. But with a collateral mortgage, your freedom to move will be constrained.

Your residential mortgage is coming up for renewal. Your lender won’t match the competition, so you decide to get a better rate elsewhere.

Moving a mortgage at the end of a three-year or five-year term is no big deal. The new provider usually covers any transfer fees.

But switching is more costly if you have a collateral mortgage. You must hire a lawyer and pay about $1,000 to discharge the mortgage before you can move to a new lender.

Since 2010, TD Canada Trust has sold only collateral mortgages. Tangerine Bank (formerly ING Direct) changed to collateral mortgages in 2011. National Bank also offers them.

Having a collateral mortgage affects your ability to transfer your mortgage to a new lender and your ability to borrow additional funds. It can also affect your ability to discharge the mortgage after repaying the loan in full.Many people don’t know the difference between a conventional and a collateral mortgage, since the information is buried in the fine print of a detailed agreement.

Last August federal Finance Minister Joe Oliver announced an agreement with eight major banks, under which they would voluntarily disclose general information about collateral mortgages at their websites by Sept. 1, 2014, and in their branches by Nov. 30, 2014.

Finally, the banks would provide specific information to consumers who were entering into a new mortgage agreement by Jan. 31, 2015.

Has voluntary disclosure worked? I found almost nothing when checking the banks’ websites. But the Canadian Bankers Association’s website has an article, “Mortgage Security,” to which individual members can provide links.

With a conventional charge, only the amount of the actual mortgage loan is registered against your home. If you borrow $250,000, the lender will register a $250,000 amount as a liability on your property.

With a collateral charge, an amount higher than the actual mortgage loan may be registered against your home. If you borrow $250,000, the lender can choose to register a $300,000 or $400,000 amount.

This allows you to get an extra $50,000 to $100,000 at a later date, secured by the mortgage, without having to discharge the loan and go through a costly refinancing. However, you must meet certain conditions in order to borrow more money.

“You will need to apply and be approved by the lender for the increased amount, based on the current criteria of the lender, your ability to repay the mortgage loan and verification that your home’s value supports the mortgage loan request,” says the CBA.

Dan Faubert, an Ottawa mortgage broker, wrote a blog post last August about thepitfalls of a collateral mortgage. He used the example of John Smith (not his real name), who was denied a loan to fix up his home.

The man owned a home worth $375,000. He had $25,000 left on his mortgage and a $250,000 balance on his home equity line of credit — a total debt of $275,000.

Unfortunately, he didn’t know the bank had registered a $375,000 mortgage against his home. Most collateral mortgages are registered at 100 per cent of the property’s value and some go up to 125 per cent, depending on the lender.

Smith wanted $25,000 to renovate. He was planning to sell his house. But since he was retired and had a lower income than when he borrowed the money, he didn’t qualify for a bank loan.

Faubert couldn’t get him any more money, nor could any other mortgage broker, since the collateral mortgage was registered for 100 per cent of the property’s value.

Smith had borrowed $275,000 and his home was worth $375,000, but there was no equity against which to register a mortgage. It is a dilemma that could face other Canadians who carry a mortgage with them into retirement.

“Any mortgage with any bank that has multiple products in one mortgage is also registered as a collateral mortgage,” says Faubert, who recommends asking lenders for an explanation before agreeing to new financing.

I predict the trend to collateral mortgages will spread. Banks benefit by making it more difficult — or impossible, in some cases — to switch lenders before a mortgage is discharged.

Oliver should check the banks’ voluntary disclosure under the agreement announced last year. Customers need to know in clear terms, explained by a real person and not just in fine print, about a key change to the standard mortgage contract.

http://www.thestar.com/business/2015/02/17/a-collateral-mortgage-can-trap-you-roseman.html

Calgary – 5th BEST place to live in the world! – the Economist

This is why Calgary housing prices are supported by about 20,000 new arrivals a year. The in-migration will continue for a while yet … and that will support housing prices.

Three Canadian cities — Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary — have been named as some of the best places to live in the world, according to a report by The Economist.

In the annual poll ranked Vancouver as 3rd most livable city in the world; followed by Toronto at No. 4, and Calgary tied for fifth place with Adelaide, Australia.

… The Economist ranks the cities on 30 factors across various categories, including stability, health care, culture, environment, education and infrastructure.

the article is here: http://www.thestar.com/business/2014/08/19/melbourne_wins_tops_most_liveable_city_ranking_three_canadian_cities_in_top_10_list.html

 

 

CMHC and Flood Damaged Homes in YYC / Calgary

We get this question often as there is lots of fully bizarre data out there.

Here is what we are seeing. Remember, as the #1 mortgage brokerage/ franchise in ALL of Canada for 2013 at the countries largest SuperBroker – Mortgage Alliance we see lots of deal flow so this is based off of many hundreds of conversations with the insurers and lenders:

  • IF the flood damage has been repaired AND you are in the flood zone then an insurer (CMHC/ Genworth/ Canada Guarantee) WILL / can insurer your purchase with as little as 5% down as long as all the other normal criteria are met.
  • IF there is damage that is not repaired then the odds of an approval with an insurer are very, very LOW. Often, even if you put 20% or more down, and do the purchase without CMHC involved, the lenders are not taking the risk and doing them.

the KEY is to fix the damage first, then sell.

Call if you have any questions on this as there are many specific examples that are not mentioned above.

Mortgage Mark

403-681-4376