Top Calgary Mortgage Broker

Completed 2% of all FTHBI mortgages in YYC

Are you looking for a Mortgage Broker who specializes in the FTHBI in Calgary? That would be us!

We have completed 6 of these deals in 2019. There was as total of 260. So that puts us at completing 2.5% of the entire Calgary market for this program. Interesting!

Obviously, we love this program for these 2 reasons:

  1. You save between $100 and $200 per month on the mortgage payments. For sure. From Day 1.
    1. The point of the program is to lower your mortgage payments. When the government puts 5% down for you, it lowers the total balance outstanding and this lowers the payments.
  2. You save about $4000 in the CMHC fees.
    1. You put down 5%, and the government matches 5% on existing homes. That means your CMHC fee is based on 10% down and not 5% down, and you save that from Day 1 as well.

The down side

The down side is this is registered as an interest free loan from the government. You still pay them back 5% of the sale price when you sell. That is 5% of whatever the sale price is so it could be more or less, but it is still 5%.

“The down side is not a big deal!

Guaranteed lower mortgage payments and lower CMHC fee! This is a win!”

Mortgage Mark Herman, Top Calgary Mortgage Broker near me.

FREE RESEARCH Data on the First Time Home Buyer Incentive from Mortgage Mark Herman.

  • Call us for all the data you need on this program.
  • We have it all and can explain it to you -it is a long, boring read.

Here is the link to the full article, pasted below https://www.canadianmortgagetrends.com/2020/02/cmhcs-first-time-home-buyer-incentive-off-slow-start/

Four months after its official launh, CMHC’s First-Time Home Buyer Incentive had funded just 4% of its three-year goal, according to new data provided by the agency.

From the time the down payment assistance program launched on Sept. 2 to Dec. 9, CMHC received just 3,252 applications from across Canada, 2,730 of which were approved. That translated into total funding of $51.3 millionwell off pace of the agency’s three-year target of $1.25 billion.

Under the program, the government will provide first-time buyers with an interest-free down payment loan of up to 5% for resale purchases, and 10% if the property is a new build. The CMHC then participates in any rise or fall in value of the home, and the loan must be repaid either when the house is sold or within 25 years.

Interest in the program was highest in Quebec, where 1,300 applications were received. Comparatively, just 436 Ontarians applied, according to statistics that were tabled in Parliament last week.

Here’s a look at the breakdown of applications from some of the major housing markets across Canada:

  • Greater Toronto Area: 148
  • Vancouver: 45
  • Edmonton: 447
  • Calgary: 260
  • Winnipeg: 144
  • Montreal 654
  • Halifax: 64
  • New Brunswick: 60
  • PEI: 12

CMHC head Evan Siddall defended the results via Twitter on Friday:

“In addition to CMHC’s challenges in estimating demand for the FTHBI, uneven lender support is a complicating factor,” he tweeted on Friday. “It may also be evidence that there is less unsatisfied FTHBI demand due to the stress test than people claim. People can always buy less expensive homes.

Why is the FTHBI Unpopular?

Since the initiative was first announced in the Liberals’ spring budget, many in the industry have criticized it for being overly complicated and promising negligible benefits.

One of the biggest restrictions of the program is that it’s currently limited to purchases of up to $565,000. In markets like Toronto and Vancouver, buyers can be hard-pressed to find available properties under that threshold. According to recent data from the Toronto Real Estate Board, the average sale price in December was $837,788.

Many buyers have also expressed unease at the thought of giving up equity in their home, particularly with prices rising rapidly in many markets across the country.

While Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised tweaks to the FTHBI during last year’s federal election, no additional updates have since been provided. The proposed changes would increase the maximum purchase price eligible under the program to $789,000 for buyers in Toronto, Vancouver and Victoria.

It remains to be seen whether the FTHBI’s slow start is a harbinger of future demand over the coming years, or whether first-time buyers will grow more receptive to sharing a chunk of their home equity with the government.

UPDATE: NHBI Canada

Here is an UPDATE to the Canadian New First Time Home Buyer Incentive Program

A Calgary lawyer recently had an opportunity to review the program and attend a basic seminar. He said he would not recommend the “down payment equity share” program to a first time home buyer for the following reasons – BUT here are our replies  … and the Program DOES make sense to do.

NEGATIVE POINTS and the reasons FOR the program are below:

  1. It will take much longer to be approved for this program than for a normal mortgage loan and sellers may not accommodate the longer condition time.
  • We normally pre-approve buyers with these files and this program in advance so there is no extra time needed at the lenders for conditions.
  • The math for this program is complicated and buyers that use this program need to be pre-approved as they need the mortgage to match the affordability guidelines and to shop in the right price range.
  • The extra time is at closing when 2 sets of documents are needed by the lawyer. As long as this is known in advance, the closing date can be long enough to allow for the extra paperwork to be requested and completed.

 

  1. Higher legal and appraisal costs will result as two separate mortgages have to be prepared and registered (one for the lender and one for the equity share) and an extra appraisal will have to be obtained and paid for by the owner if paying out the incentive mortgage prior to the ultimate sale of the property.
  • A 1st and 2nd mortgages go on title at the same time as closing.
  • Appraisal on purchase is not involved as it has to be a CMHC approved mortgage (CMHC is responsible for the appraisal in this case) and the program is based on the purchase price.
  • If the owner wants to pay it off / back sooner, then an appraisal is needed at buyer cost ~$350.
  • This would happen if the owner wanted to do extensive renovations to the home.
  • An appraisal should not be needed on a bonafide sale, to a 3rd party, via a realtor, and when listed on MLS.
  • An appraisal MAY be needed – as the owners cost – if the sale if it is a “private sale” and/ or believed to be below market value.
  • (This is to stop the owner from selling the home to a family member for $1.00 and then attempt to repay the loan with $0.05.)
  • The buyer has already saved many times the extra costs, savings are about $100 – $150/ month, from day 1. Paying-out at 10, 15, 20 years later … they have already saved $100 x 12 x 10 years = $12,000, in the bank, already.

 

  1. A disincentive to improve/renovate the property will exist as any appreciated value is shared with the government notwithstanding that they don’t contribute to the renovation costs.
  • True.
  • Upon repayment, improvements will be included when determining the market value, therefore the Homebuyer will have to consider the cost and benefit of the planned renovations, and decide whether to repay the Incentive prior to making any home improvements.
  • IMPORTANT: It may be beneficial to the Homebuyer to repay the Incentive prior to conducting any major renovations to the home.

 

  1. A potential trap is being created for non-permanent residents who are legally authorized to work in Canada who can qualify to buy under this program but will have extreme difficulty in selling when their work permit expires as they will not have sufficient equity to satisfy the required withholding requirements under the Income Tax Act
  • We have been the largest Mortgage Alliance brokerage in Canada for 6 years in a row, and we do about 20 deals a year for 9xx SIN buyers; 99% of our customers are unaffected by this.
  • Again, this program is surgical in for who it works for. The program is not for everyone.

 

  1. It may be more difficult to refinance the property (it is not clear whether  the Government will permit refinancing of the first mortgage and postpone their security to the new financing)

Updated rules have been released:

  • The home CAN be refinanced without triggering repayment of the incentive, however, the shared equity mortgage will only be postponed to the outstanding balance that would otherwise be owing under the first ranking mortgage (i.e. no equity take-out will be permitted ahead of the shared equity mortgage).

Note:

  • The combination of all charges on a refinance must not exceed 80%.
  • This program DOES allow Assumption of the mortgage. Standard rules apply: full requalification by the parties assuming the mortgage directly with the lender. The standard on-going ramifications to the seller still apply.
  • This program does NOT allow a PORT of the mortgage to another property. It would have to be paid out at that time.

 

  1. If refinancing of the first mortgage will not be possible without paying out the government’s equity share, then the first mortgage lender will have a captive borrower.  The lender will have no incentive to reduce posted mortgage rates on renewal resulting in substantially higher interest rates in the second and subsequent mortgage terms for the homeowner.
  • As above, the rules do allow the home to be refinanced without triggering repayment of the incentive.
  • The renewal rate offered by the lender is independent of the 2nd charge on title.

Side note: We see that lenders are already applying the “Stress Test” under-the-covers on renewals when calculating the renewal rates. More on my blog here: https://markherman.ca/2019/06/

 

 We love this New Home Buyer Incentive Program – NHBI

Mortgage Mark Herman; Best, Top Calgary Mortgage Broker

Should you look at 7 and 10 year terms?

With rates on the rise, is it worth a 2nd look at longer term mortgages?

Data:

  • Rates have substantially increased over the last 6 of months. We have seen 3 prime rate increases with more on the horizon.
  • Fixed rate mortgages have also followed suit due to bond market instability and the increases are noticeable.
  • Consumer sentiment has rapidly moved from Variables rates to longer term Fixed rates of 5, 7, and 10 years.

The long-term trend for rates is up!

The advantage of Fixed rates is that they provide clients with added security and stability against this recent storm of volatility. This storm doesn’t seem to have an end in sight either with many questions still to be answered in the coming months. When will bond rates stabilize?  Will global pressures continue to drive increases?  Will we see a return to historical norms? What will be the impact of recent events on the Canadian economy?

Some clients are more concerned with rate trends these days it’s with good reason. Perhaps the interim answer to all this instability and volatility is to start looking long “term”. 7 & 10 year terms to be specific.

Longer term mortgages like a 7 & 10 year term help insulate clients against potential increases in the short to long-term as well as provide safety and consistency with mortgage payments that won’t fluctuate with the markets volatility.

We don’t have to go back very far (6-7yrs) to a time when 10 year mortgages were a very popular and attractive option. During that period of time many case studies show this product didn’t work out for those borrowers who selected those 10 year terms, however there was a major difference between that period of time and today. 6-7 years ago we were in a more stable rate environment and there was very little difference between the 5 & 10 year rates at the time. Shortly after this period, rates quickly dropped to even further all-time lows.

Compare those details to our current market situation where rates have now bottomed, and it becomes quickly apparent rates have been continually rising with more sustained increases forecasted.

If security is your top key, lets talk about a 7 or 10 year mortgage option today.

Mortgage Mark Herman

Top Calgary Alberta Mortgage Broker

403-681-4376

Calgary Housing Affordabilty IMPROVES!

This short version of the article should provide some confidence that the sky is not falling in Calgary and we will recover.

Mortgage Mark Herman, Best Calgary mortgage broker for home purchases and mortgage renewals


Housing affordability continues to improve in Calgary market

Owning a home in Calgary at market price remains more affordable than it has been on average since the middle of the 1980s, says a new report released Monday by RBC Economics Research.

But the latest Housing Trends and Affordability Report said movements in oil prices are likely to exert a stronger influence on the market direction in the short term.

“Alberta’s housing market is still feeling the impact from the oil price shock,” said Craig Wright, senior vice-president and chief economist, RBC. “That said, the dust began to settle this spring, and we saw a gradual recovery in confidence, which helped rebalance demand-supply conditions. Home re-sales started to turn around, and sellers no longer rushed to list their properties.”

The RBC Housing Affordability measures, which capture the proportion of pre-tax household income needed to service the costs of owning a home at market values, fell slightly in Calgary for both two-storey homes, to 31.9 per cent, and bungalows to 32.4 per cent. The measure for condos stayed relatively the same 19.5 per cent.

RBC’s Housing Affordability measure for the benchmark detached bungalow in Canada’s largest cities was: Vancouver 88.6 (up 3.0 percentage points); Toronto 59.4 (up 2.1 percentage points); Montreal 36.0 (down 1.2 percentage points); Ottawa 35.4 (unchanged); Calgary 32.4 (down 0.4 percentage points); Edmonton 32.5 (down 0.4 percentage points).

“With home resales beginning to turn around and sellers no longer rushing to list their properties in the spring, there was evidence that confidence slowly returned to the Alberta market in the second quarter following the hard blow delivered by the oil price plunge in the previous two quarters,” said the report.

mtoneguzzi@calgaryherald.com

http://calgaryherald.com/business/real-estate/housing-affordability-continues-to-improve-in-calgary-market

Payout penalties – how the Big-5 banks get you

Below is a great example of how the Big-5 banks get you on a mortgage payout.

Always talk to a broker about your mortgage because Grandma used to say, “the rate is the rate, but the details are the details!”

Mark Herman

Top Alberta mortgage broker for home purchases and mortgage renewals


As you can see from the example below, the banks “discount rate recapture policy” can result in some pretty hefty added costs —$6,048 in the scenario here!

Example:

On July 31, 2011, you buy your first home and sign a five-year, fixed-term mortgage. As your family grows, you start looking at a bigger home, and after a few months of searching, you find the perfect one—on August 1, 2013.

Because of this unexpected upgrade, you now have to break your mortgage three years before it matures (you have $320,000 left on your mortgage). When you signed your current mortgage, you weren’t concerned about prepayment penalties, but as you can see below, prepayment penalties can have a significant financial impact on your bottom line.

Your situation
Mortgage date July 21, 2011
Date you break your mortgage August 1, 2013
How much you have left owing on your mortgage $320, 000
Your original mortgage term 5 years
How many years left you have on your term 3 years
Comparison
Mortgage breakage fee at the Big-5 banks Mortgage breakage fee with Broker Banks
5-year posted rate when you got your mortgage 5.39% Not applicable for the IRD calculation
Your actual contract rate 4.00% 4.00%
Discount 1.39% N/A
3-year posted rate on August 1, 2013 (the day you break your mortgage) 3.75% 2.99%
IRD formula (Contract rate – [Posted rate for remaining term – Discount from original mortgage]) x Principal outstanding x Remaining term (Contract rate – Posted rate for remaining term) x Principal outstanding x Remaining term
IRD payment $15,744 $9,696
Difference in fees $6,048

For  a free mortgage check-up, or pre-approval, or compare what we can do vs. your bank, call Mark at 403-681-4376

Remember, when working with us:
• There is no cost to you for our services as the banks pay us for doing their work,
• You get our professional, un-biased advice & expertise on your mortgage,
• We answer our phones and emails, 7 days a week, from 9 – 9, including holidays,
• Your rate will be lower with us as we deal through “broker services” at the banks.

Why today’s bank rate cut is not a big deal for mortgages

Below is a great summary of why this rate cut is not a big deal mortgage wise.

All the banks kept their rates the same but for TD that lowered their Prime rate by 0.10% only. No other banks have followed yet and are not expected to. As you can see the banks will keep that rate cut to boost their profits … because they love money; specifically, your money, not you.

Variables went down only by 0.1% … and fixed rates all stayed the same … at their 115 year all-time lows. Looks like mortgage interest rates are as low as they can go.

Mark Herman, top Calgary Alberta mortgage broker for home purchases and mortgage renewals.

Why the Bank of Canada’s interest rate cut won’t help us.

The Bank of Canada decision Wednesday to cut its key lending rate for the second time this year to 0.50 per cent …

The impetus behind the cut wasn’t really about getting you to borrow more or ease your borrowing burden. It was about widening the gap between our interest rates and those in the U.S. to push our dollar down.

“Canada’s economy is undergoing a significant and complex adjustment,” the bank said in its rate decision, noting there was a modest recession in the first half of the year as the economy contracted.

Our dollar started the day down a third of a cent to 78 cents, a level not seen in 10 years. That’s going to make snowbirds unhappy, but the central bank is more interested in fuelling exports to our larger trading partner.

Can the Bank of Canada really save the day? Rates are already so low, we’re at the point of diminishing returns. Each new cut is greater in percentage terms than the last, but the real impact is smaller and smaller.

Here are four reasons this cut isn’t likely to make much difference:

1. Not much relief

If interest rates are at 15 per cent – not far off what I was paying for my first mortgage – and fall to 10 per cent, that’s a 33 per cent decline and puts a huge amount of money in your pocket.

If the rate is 0.75 per cent and falls to 0.50, it’s the same 33 per cent drop, but the saving is negligible. By the time it filters down through the banking system to your line of credit, the difference may add up to a Big Mac meal.

Wednesday’s move by the central bank means the banks will likely lower consumer borrowing costs a little. The betting is that they’ll give us 10 basis points and they’ll keep the other 15. TD Bank was first off the mark, doing just that.

So, suppose you’re a good bank customer. Your $100,000 secured line of credit is at prime, plus half a point, or 3.35 per cent (2.85 plus .50). You’re making an interest-only payment each month which comes to $279 a month.

The bank passes on 10 basis points. Your new combined rate is 3.25 per cent, or $271 a month. Spend that $8 wisely.

2. Indifferent businesses

Businesses who need money to invest are already borrowing. This rate cut won’t make a difference to their plans…

3. Indifferent consumers

…  many consumers see the low rates as normal. He’s right, in that anybody 45 or younger has only lived in an environment of falling interest rates. So 10 basis points off is just more of the same and unlikely to generate much interest….

4. Drooping dollar

Economist have noted that the January rate cut did send the dollar lower, but did little to accelerate growth, even as the loonie fell from 87 cents to about 82 cents and now 78 cents..

http://www.thestar.com/business/personal_finance/2015/07/15/4-reasons-the-bank-of-canadas-interest-rate-cut-wont-help-us-mayers.html

Divorce and Mortgages

We do lots of mortgages for divorces – because they are complicated. Both people want to buy after or one buys out the other. BUT, you have to set the seperation agreement up correctly so this can happen.

Banks mess this up EVEY time as the math is complicated and people at banks are not licenced mortgage brokers 99% of the time.

Why not use the #1 mortgge brokerage in all of Canada for 2 years in a row to ensure your seperateion agreement is set up to work for both of you?

Mark Herman, Calgary Alberta mortgage broker and divorce mortgage specialist.

Below are some interesting numbers for Divorces:

If the Calgary- Red Deer – Edmonton Corridor was an actual country it would have:

  • a growth rate only 2nd to China – in all the world and
  • the highest divorce rate in all the world.

Other Key Findings
•Annual average of divorces in Canada: 71,000
•Marriages that won’t reach their 50th anniversary: 43%

Divorce Rates around the World
Sweden 55%
US, Australia 46%
United Kingdom 43%
Canada 40%
Israel 26%
Switzerland 25%
Greece 18%
Singapore, Poland 17%
Spain 15%
Italy 12%
Marriage rate in Newfoundland and Labrador 54.3% (highest in Canada)
Marriage rate in Quebec 37.5% (lowest in Canada)
Month with the highest Separation applications? January

Mortgage Rules for Divorces, updated for MArch, 2015:
In situations where two parties are on title to a property in the process of a legal separation where one party will keep the existing property, the following guidelines will now apply:

•Applications may be submitted as a purchase loan up to 95% LTV – or 5% down
•Both parties must be on title to the property prior to the legal separation
•Since this purchase transaction is non-arms length, a full internal appraisal is required

•The following documents confirming the sale price and transfer of title must be on file:

  1. Finalized separation agreement
  2. Offer to purchase

Calgary – 5th BEST place to live in the world! – the Economist

This is why Calgary housing prices are supported by about 20,000 new arrivals a year. The in-migration will continue for a while yet … and that will support housing prices.

Three Canadian cities — Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary — have been named as some of the best places to live in the world, according to a report by The Economist.

In the annual poll ranked Vancouver as 3rd most livable city in the world; followed by Toronto at No. 4, and Calgary tied for fifth place with Adelaide, Australia.

… The Economist ranks the cities on 30 factors across various categories, including stability, health care, culture, environment, education and infrastructure.

the article is here: http://www.thestar.com/business/2014/08/19/melbourne_wins_tops_most_liveable_city_ranking_three_canadian_cities_in_top_10_list.html

 

 

YYC & YEG set to lead ALL of Canada for growth

Calgary and Edmonton and all of Alberta continue to grow = housing price support, which is pretty much the theme to 50% of the data I post. Alberta is the only province that is continually growing and we would be competing with China’s growth rate if Alberta were a country.

Edmonton housing market overtakes Calgary in investment ranking

Both cities poised to lead Canadian economic growth

CALGARY — Edmonton has overtaken Calgary as the top community in Alberta to invest in residential real estate.

The ranking was done by the Real Estate Invesment Network and released Saturday. Edmonton was second behind Calgary on last year’s list.

“Before the flood hit, Calgary’s real estate market was performing right in tune to the underlying economic fundamentals. Not too hot, not too cold,” said Don Campbell, senior analyst of the REIN Research Institute. “After the floods hit, the rental as well as the housing markets over-performed the underlying fundamentals and have pushed it into the too hot level, but this situation should not last longer than 12 months. We continue to experience zero vacancy rates, strong in-migration, one of the strongest job creation economies in the country. So slowdown of the effect of the post-flood transaction bump will not be felt negatively in the market due to the pent-up demand. Good news overall for Calgary’s market for the coming years.

“Calgary did not, in essence, lose its No. 1 ranking. It is still one of the top places in North America for property investment. However, Edmonton grabbed the No. 1 ranking because it is behind Calgary in its residential and industrial recovery curve. This means that Edmonton’s market, beginning at a lower position in the real estate cycle, should slightly outperform the returns a homeowner or investors will experience in Calgary, which is already 12 to 18 months ahead on the cycle.”

Campbell said both cities are poised to be economic leaders in Canada in 2014 and 2015 and therefore the forecast for in-migration and housing demand remains very strong.

The ranking for other Alberta communities are: 3. Airdrie; 4. Leduc; 5. St. Albert; 6. Red Deer; 7. Fort Saskatchewan; 8. Fort McMurray; 9. Grande Prairie; 10. Lloydminster; 11. Okotoks; and 12. Lethbridge.